TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

Top 10 Famous Female Scientists

For a long time, science has been the domain of men. Thus, women could not access the university until the end of the nineteenth century. That time lies behind us and women have proven to be as capable in the field of science as their male colleagues. Who are the ten most famous female scientists?

10. Jane Goodall

jane Goodall - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

British anthropologist and biologist Jane Goodall became world famous for her research on chimpanzees. Thanks to Goodall’s observations, our knowledge of human apes has increased dramatically. She charted how chimpanzees use simple tools, go hunting together and carry war with other tribes or monkeys. A major break with her predecessors was the assignment of names to the monkeys she observed. This helped her get a special connection with the chimpanzees who allowed her in the group. Goodall has been an important advocate for the maintenance of human beings for years .

 TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

9. Dorothy Hodgkin

dorothy hodgkin - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

Dorothy Hodgkin was a British chemist. She grew up in Egypt during her first childhood but was sent to England after the World War I broke out. There was when she went to study but a college in Oxford that allowed women. Hodgkin became a pioneer in X-ray crystallography, a method that determines the three-dimensional structure of molecules. As a result, the functioning of certain substances such as penicillin can be better understood. In 1964 she received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for her research in this field. Hodgkin suffered from early rheumatoid arthritis, which led her to a large part of her life in a wheelchair. However, this did not prevent Hodgkin from her scientific work.

 TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

8.Barbara McClintock

Barbara McClintock - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

The American botanist Barbara McClintock is now seen as one of the most important genetic scientists of all time. However, this recognition was only late. McClintock studied botany and was above average interested in corn. She studied how the chromosomes of this plant changed during reproduction. For this she developed a special visualization technique. Her studies on translocation, a form of mutation of hereditary material, would be of great importance in the research into cancer and hereditary diseases. After a period when her ideas were received with skepticism, McClintock became increasingly imitated. This resulted in a Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1983 .

7. Maria Goeppert-Mayer

Maria Goeppert Mayer - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

The father of Maria Goeppert-Mayer, born in Germany, believed strongly in equal opportunities for men and women. His only child was encouraged to follow a good education. At the University of Götingen where her father worked, she met a large number of famous scientists like Heisenberg and Pauli. She wanted to become a mathematician first but studied physics during her studies. Maria Goeppert moved to the United States after her marriage with physicist Joseph Edward-Mayer. Despite her talents, she has difficulty in getting a permanent appointment. In the end, Goeppert-Mayer received international recognition for her research with Hans Jensen to the shell structure of the atomic nucleus. For this purpose, they received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1963.

6. Rosalind Franklin

Rosalind Franklin - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

Unlike Goeppert-Mayer, Rosalind’s father Franklin was at higher education for women. This while his daughter at a young age had talent for physics and chemistry. A Rosalind aunt would support her at the expense of her university study. Franklin would study for a while in Paris where she was introduced to x-ray differentiation. Her x-ray diffraction photos of DNA would be an important step in defining the DNA structure. Franklin died of cancer at a young age and could not be honored with a Nobel Prize awarded to Watson, Crick and Wilkins in 1962 for the discovery of the DNA structure . Franklin’s colleague Aaron Klug would continue her work and get the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1982.

5. Gertrude Elion

Gertrude Elion - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

The American Gertrude Elion studied chemistry but had difficulty finding work in this men’s glove. In 1944, Elion found a job at Burroughs Wellcome Research Laboratories where she would continue to work for her retirement. She worked here as assistant of the famous pharmacologist George Hitchings and would do some important chemical discoveries. This enabled her to develop with Hitching’s drugs against gout, arthritis, malaria and the rejection of transplanted organs. In 1988, Elion and Hitchings were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology of Medicine.

4. Irène Joliot-Curie

Ir%C3%A8ne Joliot Curie - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

As a child of a famous parent, it is often difficult to make a self-name, let alone two famous parents.Irène Joliot-Curie was in that position because her parents were the famous chemists Marie and Pierre Curie. Like her mother, she was fascinated by radioactivity. She worked with her mother at the front during the First World War and then became her assistant. She married the chemist Frédéric Joliot with which she researched the production of artificial radioactive elements. In 1935, Joliot-Curie received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Continuous working with radioactive elements was not without danger, and like her mother, Joliot-Curie would die of leukemia.

 TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

3. Lise Meitner

Lise Meitner - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

Lise Meitner (born 1878) lived at a time when many universities were not yet accessible to women. After secondary school, she could only attend a private school. At the age of 23, the hair finally closed to be admitted to the University of Vienna. For a long time, Meitner seemed to choose a practical choice like French or philosophy but eventually became the physics in which she also graduated. As a pioneer, Meitner would ever again encounter obstacles, she hardly worked as a woman in her field. In Berlin she would work with Otto Hahn and research radioactivity. Hahn received the Nobel Prize in 1944 and initially minimized Meitner’s work, although he secretly gave her a part of the prize money. During her life, Meitner was nominated many times for the Nobel Prize but would never win him. As a result, she became a symbol of the subordinate position of female scientists. In compensation, Meitner would later receive a number of important scientific awards in her career.

2. Ada Lovelace

Ada Lovelace - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

Augusta Ada Lovelace was the daughter of English poet Byron. She was raised during her childhood by her mother who encouraged Ada to become a researcher. Lovelace had an exceptional mathematical understanding and came into contact with Charles Babbage , the designer of the analytical machine, the forerunner of the modern computer. Unlike Babbage who considered the machine merely as a calculator, Lovelace realized that it could have many more possibilities. Her ideas about this are considered the first attempt to write a computer program. Unfortunately Lovelace died at the age of 36 before she could work out her ideas. Since 2009, Ada Lovelace Day celebrates the achievements of female scientists.

1. Marie Curie

Marie Curie - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

The most famous female scientist would be born in 1867 as Marie Skłodowska in Poland. At school she appeared but in the part of Poland occupied by Russia, women did not have access to the university. In 1891 she went to Paris where she studied Sorbonne mathematics, chemistry and physics. She would come into contact with the natural Pierre Curie with whom she married in 1895 for subsequent work.As Marie Curie, she would increasingly focus on the study of newly discovered uranium jets. She gave the phenomenon the name of radioactivity. The Curies would together receive the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903. After her husband accidentally failed in 1906, she got her chair at the Sorbonne. With this she became the first female professor at this renowned institute. In 1911 Curie received a second Nobel Prize, this time of Chemistry for her discovery of the elements radium and polonium. In 1909 she received the lead of the new Institute of Radium (nowadays Institut Curie) in Paris where she studied, while in a second part, the biological and medical effects of radioactivity were studied. Her daughter Irène took charge of the institute in 1930, even though she would stay dead until her death. In 1934 Marie Curie died of leukemia after she had been exposed to radiation regularly during her career. The chemical element Curium (Cm) was named after her.

TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

pinit fg en rect red 28 - TOP 10 MOST FAMOUS FEMALE SCIENTIST

MORE TOP 10 LISTS

MORE TOP 10 LISTS